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The connection between online hate speech and real-world hate crime

The connection between online hate speech and real-world hate crime

This percentage was 47% in 2017 and 34% in 2016. It would be surprising to know that in 2016 the number of 12-15 year old was very high. After 6 years, today in 2022, the age of these children will be 18-21 years. And today these same children must have been victims of hate speech or hate crimes or trying to reach such an incident.

Nowadays, the way many users are using hate speech online, it is creating an environment of insecurity for every unit of the society and as a result, we are facing increasing number of such crime. witness

It is natural to have ideological differences in society, but ideological differences, religious-belief, come under the charge of a different spirit and then attack him with insult or vengeance, kill him, or in any way physically, mentally They affect. To do economic loss is inhuman. And, doing something like this by someone is a stigma to the human society because we human beings are ahead of all intellectual power and our heart, mind, brain is capable of understanding us and walking with patience, that much understanding we get automatically. , Is.

The growing trend of hate speech available on all educational and government websites clearly shows that over half (53%) of UK adult internet users reported viewing hateful content online in 2018. This percentage was 47% in 2017 and 34% in 2016. It would be surprising to know that in 2016 the number of 12-15 year olds was very high. After 6 years, today in 2022, the age of these children will be 18-21 years. And today these same children must have been victims of hate speech or hate crimes or trying to reach such an incident.

The survey data only captures a snap-shot of the online hate incident. Data science methods help provide a real-time view of hate speech crime in action, creating a more complete picture.

Following the Brexit vote in 2016 and 2017, and a series of terrorist attacks in the UK, there was a significant and unprecedented increase in online hate speech and offline hate crime. Although online hate speech production increased dramatically in the wake of all these incidents, it was less likely to garner retweets in volume and survive longer. Where the hate speech was retweeted, it stemmed from a core group of like-minded people who seek each other’s messages. The hate speech generated specifically around the Brexit vote was found to be largely inspired by a small number of Twitter accounts.

Many governments now recognize the dangerous problem of online hate speech, and how social media platforms are being manipulated by far-right groups and nefarious states to increase political polarization to their advantage. If we are to understand our online activities as an extension of our offline lives, and not as some isolated virtual experience that has no consequences beyond the Internet, then phenomena such as online hate speech are likely to reach physical space. . But until recently there has been a lack of evidence on the effects of online hate speech and increased online polarization on community tensions on the streets.

It is not possible to conclude that online hate speech directly causes offline hate crime. We all know that social media is now part of the hate crime formula. Hate crime is a process, not a discrete act, that ranges from hate speech to violent attacks on the victim. This process is determined in the geographical, social, historical and political context. The technical context should now become a part of this concept.

Three major social media companies introduced hate speech policies after pressure from national and supranational governments. But despite these efforts, it is clear that social media, and especially newer platforms with strong free speech principles (such as Voat, Gab and 8chan), are widely infected by a casual low-level intolerance for racial and other went. With interdisciplinary work the researchers are now closer to showing when and where this online intolerance spreads in violent ways on the streets.

By Sangram Panesar, Chairman, Tellmasa.org